Education

Chinese Immersion School Expansion Backed by Education Commissioner in Massachusetts

Pioneer Valley Chinese Immersion Charter School in Hadley, Massachusetts, has gained the recommendation of the state education commissioner to be allowed to open a full high school.

Elementary and secondary education commissioner Mitchell Chester recommended the school to expand its curriculum to include grades all the way up to the 12th grade, according to The Daily Hampshire Gazette.

The school currently offers  kindergarten through ninth grade.

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New York High School to Offer Chinese Classes for the First Time Ever

A public high school in New York will offer Chinese classes for its students for the first time ever, starting this year.

Kids at Fairport High School will be able to take beginning Chinese class in September, according to the Fairport-East Rochester Post.

Students will learn grammar, pronunciation and writing for Mandarin Chinese in the elective class offered through the Chinese School of Rochester. Nearby Brighton High School will host the 16 consecutive weekly lessons on Saturdays.

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Chinese School in New Jersey Celebrates 50 Years

For five decades, Mid-Jersey Chinese School has helped teach Chinese culture and language to children across central New Jersey, turning 50 years old this Chinese New Year.

The school has invited members of the local community to join in a large celebration showcasing the school’s contributions, according to East Brunswick Patch.

We at Chinese Fridge were very impressed to learn that the school offers three varieties of language classes for K-12 students — classes for heritage speakers who speak Chinese at home, kids who don’t speak Chinese at home and those who want to learn Cantonese.

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Chinese School for Kids: Twitter’s Take

For a lot of overseas Chinese kids, Chinese school can be a real source of complaints. So many kids don’t want to spend their precious weekend hours learning Chinese. At the same time, however, many kids come to realize how grateful they are for these classes — especially as they grow older. It becomes almost a bonding experience for kids who went and experienced it.

We were curious to see what students were saying about Chinese School and Chinese Classes on Twitter, so we took to the Twitterverse to find out. We hope that our Chinese game app can help these kids alleviate some of their reluctance to study Chinese, but until then, here are some of the highlights we found on Twitter (with a little commentary of our own):

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Chinese Alphabet for Kids Misconception

Author’s Note: If you’re looking for a Chinese alphabet that resembles English, check out our article explaining Pinyin.

We’ve heard parents ask about a “Chinese alphabet for kids” a lot, and each time we have to clarify that Chinese traditionally doesn’t really have an alphabet. But while Chinese people don’t really use an alphabet, there are two predominant phonetic systems that are basically alphabets, but Chinese people never use these to communicate — they’re seen as a learning aid for foreign people and small children. Instead, Chinese people read and write using Chinese characters, which are often comprised of shared base elements known as “radicals”.

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Conn. School’s Chinese Classes Up For Vote

A Connecticut school will soon offer Mandarin Chinese for kids to learn if the town’s school board agrees to a recommendation from the school superintendent, The Cheshire Citizen reports.

Part of the reason for the suggestion is the recent trend for schools to start offering Chinese classes for kids.

“Assistant School Superintendent Scott Detrick said he’s seen more and more school districts offering Chinese in the state and nationwide,” the article from The Cheshire Citizen said.

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7-Year-Old Becomes Youngest Mobile Game App Maker

A 7-year-old girl has become the youngest person to ever make a mobile game app, according to Mashable.

First grade student Zora Ball’s game app premiered last month at the University of Pennsylvania’s Bootstrap Expo, which showcased projects built using the Bootstrap programming method that helps facilitate the app development process.

We’re proud of Zora and her amazing feat, and think the Bootstrap language could be a great way to make it easier for everyone to make mobile game apps like Chinese Fride, our Chinese game app for kids.

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Misleading Dell Infographic Claims Chinese Schools Beat US in Tech Integration

An infographic making rounds across the web is making dramatic claims that China is doing a better job of adopting technology in classrooms than the United States — but there’s one little problem: the data is virtually invalid.

There is clear sample bias in the Dell survey and infographic which sampled “[525] respondents in China [that] came from predominantly major cities and are mostly urban respondents,” C. Custer of techinasia.com points out.

This suggests a very select group that wouldn’t account for rural areas where many of the poorer population lives. Also, the economic disparity in China is immense — so much so that a small portion of the population is vastly rich while the large majority of citizens have very modest incomes. Surely sampling a mere 525 people in the most advanced cities of a country with more than a billion people is not a solid survey. In fact, it’s ludicrous to believe it is. It would be like sampling 140 people in New York and San Francisco for a technology adoption study representing the entire United States.

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Why I Created Chinese Fridge

Many people have asked me why I decided to create Chinese Fridge — where the idea of a Chinese game for kids came from, how I created the app and what I hope to accomplish from it. The answer to all of these questions lies in my personal educational experience throughout my childhood and my desire to improve access to education for future generations.

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